Australian Shepherd and Miniature American Shepherd Breed Information

The Australian Shepherd and Miniature American Shepherd have several characteristics are clearly different.  First, they different with size, head type, as well as temperament.  Below is information about both breeds that we breed and show.  

  • Personality: Smart, watchful, lively; a loyal snuggler when off-duty

  • Energy Level: Very active; enjoys physical activity and training

  • Good with Children: Yes

  • Good with Other Dogs: Yes

  • Shedding: Frequent

  • Grooming: Daily or weekly

  • Trainability: Eager to please

  • Height: 14-18 inches (male), 13-17 inches (female)

  • Weight: 20-40 pounds

  • Life Expectancy: 12-13 years

  • Barking Level: Infrequent

  • Breed Club: Miniature American Shepherd Club of America

  • Breed Club Link: http://mascusa.org/

  • Breed Standard: View

  • Group: Herding

  • 2016 Popularity: 36


A National Breed Club (Parent Club) is a national organization that is dedicated to the preservation, protection and advancement of a dog breed. The club develops the breed standard (i.e. the guidelines for how a breed should look, health testing, etc) and acts as experts on their breeds for education of the general public, breeders, and show judges. The club is a member of or licensed by the AKC to hold dog show events. The club works diligently to ensure the longevity of the breed for owners and dog lovers for years to come.

This small herder is all-American, although he may have Australian Shepherd in his ancestry. The Miniature American Shepherd has the stamina and agility of an athlete paired with devotion to his people. He's also a great travel companion and is especially popular with equestrians who travel to horse shows. With his intelligence and eagerness to please, your Miniature American Shepherd puppy is a trainable and energetic companion. He's a loyal, versatile, can-do dog, ready to join his family in any activity.

Origin: United States

Year Recognized: 2015

Breed History & Job Description: In the 1960s, small-size Australian Shepherds found working the U.S. rodeo circuit were selectively breed to further reduce their size. The new breed was originally called the Miniature Australian Shepherd. “They became especially popular with equestrians traveling to horse shows, as their intelligence, loyalty, and size made them an excellent travel companion,” the experts at the Miniature American Shepherd Club of the USA say. “In this way their popularity spread across the country.”

Miniature American Shepherds are generally a healthy breed. Like all breeds there may be some health issues. Some dogs may be faced with these health challenges in their lives, but the majority of Miniature American Shepherds are healthy dogs.

 

Recommended Health Test from the National Breed Club:

  • Hip Evaluation

  • Ophthalmologist Evaluation

  • PRA Optigen DNA Test

  • MDR1 DNA Test

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  • Personality: Smart, work-oriented, exuberant—did we mention smart?

  • Energy Level: Very Active; True working dogs, unemployment doesn't agree with these guys

  • Good with Children: Yes

  • Good with other Dogs: Yes

  • Shedding: Seasonal

  • Grooming: Occasional

  • Trainability: Eager To Please

  • Height: 20-23 inches (male), 18-21 inches (female)

  • Weight: 50-65 pounds (male), 40-55 pounds (female)

  • Life Expectancy: 12-15 years

  • Barking Level: Barks When Necessary

  • Breed Club: United States Australian Shepherd Association

  • Breed Club Link: http://www.australianshepherds.org/

  • Breed Standard: View

  • Group: Herding

  • 2016 Popularity: 16

  • Breed Referral Contact: Joyce Siddall - 303-548-1125


A National Breed Club (Parent Club) is a national organization that is dedicated to the preservation, protection and advancement of a dog breed. The club develops the breed standard (i.e. the guidelines for how a breed should look, health testing, etc) and acts as experts on their breeds for education of the general public, breeders, and show judges. The club is a member of or licensed by the AKC to hold dog show events. The club works diligently to ensure the longevity of the breed for owners and dog lovers for years to come.

While some dogs want nothing more than to curl up in your lap, the Australian Shepherd is ready to get to work. This intelligent breed is used even today as an all-around ranch hand and herder. Your Australian Shepherd puppy will thrive on lots of mental and physical exercise and excels at agility and obedience training. He'll grow up to be a loving family member, affectionate with his people and eager to be useful.

Origin: United States

Year Recognized: 1991

Breed History & Job Description: The Aussie’s world tour began in Europe, near the Pyrenees Mountains, where for centuries the Basques held a reputation as world-class shepherds. In the 1800s Basques and their dogs sailed east to try their luck in Australia, a wide-open paradise for sheepmen. After building up their flocks, the Basques left Australia for California. American ranchers assumed the Basques’ dogs were an Australian breed—thus the misleading name Australian Shepherd. Aussies, refined and perfected in America, have been an iconic part of cowboy culture ever since.

Most Aussies are energetic dogs that require vigorous daily exercise to keep them healthy and happy. When your Aussie is not being supervised, he should be confined to your home or a fenced area. Working with a responsible breeder, those wishing to own an Australian Shepherd can gain the education they need to know about specific health concerns within the breed. Good breeders utilize genetic testing of their breeding stock to reduce the likelihood of disease in their puppies.

Read the Official Breed Club Health Statement.

 

Recommended Health Tests from the National Breed Club:

  • Hip Evaluation

  • Elbow Evaluation

  • Ophthalmologist Evaluation

  • Breed Club Rescue: Aussie Rescue & Placement Helpline

  • Breed Club Rescue Phone: 877-277-4779

  • Breed Club Rescue Link: http://www.aussierescue.org/